I was totally bummed to find out last Sunday’s Six Sentence Sunday link was broken. I’ll try not to let that happen again.

This week’s submission is again from “Diva in the Dugout.” Soon after Dave meets his daughter for the first time, the three of them head to Mel’s car. He’s under the mistaken impression that Mel drinks too much because someone else spilled beer on her at the first game, so he suggests that she let him drive.

My six:

Mel stared at Dave. First he wanted her baby girl and now her car? Who gave him the right to take over her life?

You did five years ago when you had unprotected sex with the guy.

She ignored her conscience’s dig. “Who says I trust you with my car?”

I had so much fun picking last week’s Six Sentence Sunday that I decided to do it again.

This week, I’m sharing a few sentences from the scene where Dave meets his daughter. Enjoy!

He looked down at the girl, who’d plastered herself to her mamma’s leg and was watching him with wide eyes —gulp — hazel eyes that looked a lot like his. He crouched down so he was on her level, hoping to put her at ease. “Hi, Tara. That’s a beautiful name.”

“Thank you.”  She popped her thumb in her mouth.

“You know who I am?”

 

This is a week for firsts — first guest blog post, first three-minute-straight run (as part of the Couch to 5K program). I might as well add another one to the list: My first Six Sentence Sunday post.

In my WIP, “Diva in the Dugout,” Dave and Mel had one wild night together before she snuck out in the gray light of morning while he was still sleeping. Since she insisted she didn’t want to know his name, she had no way to let him know she ended up pregnant — until they bump into each other at Dave’s baseball game five years later. This is the moment Mel confirms Dave’s suspicions about his fatherhood.

Enjoy the six sentences below:

Her daughter’s father arched an eyebrow. “Cat’s got your tongue, eh?”

Get it together, Mel, this isn’t brain surgery. She offered him her widest, flirtiest smile. Maybe the charms he’d fallen for once before would soften the blow of the bomb she was about to drop. “Welcome back to Texas, Daddy.”

P.S. I just want to say, it’s a lot harder to pick out six sentences than I thought it’d be.

May 24, 2012

Musings

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Thanks to everyone who stopped by yesterday to make Love & Laughter’s first guest blogger feel welcome. With 60-plus page views, I’d call Keri Ford’s  visit a success. (Keri, please don’t tell me you were the visitor 50 of those 60 times.)

I’ve been adding to the list of articles I find intriguing, motivational or all-around hilarious. It’s time to spread the link love, so here are a few of my recent favorites. Enjoy!

— If you’re in need of a little motivation to get BICHOK (Butt in Chair, Hands on Keyboard), try these instant motivation tips from The Writer magazine. They’re drawn from recent research in neurology and psychology, so you know you’re getting some top-notch advice. My favorite part? I was already doing many of these things.

— Jody Hedlund’s posts are always chock-full of great information. Such is the case with her recent missive on why writers should be on Pinterest. I was one of those on the fence about having one more social media site to eat away at writing time … but I finally took the plunge a few months ago. (Find me here, under Arlene Hittle.) I don’t spend a whole lot of time there … yet. But I have a few boards up and running. It’s fun to look at all the pretty photos — and someday, hopefully soon, I’ll be able to add my own novel to my “books I want to read” board. Wait — I should probably file it under “books I’ve read and loved” instead.

— From Chuck Wendig of Terrible Minds: 25 reasons I hate your main character. Gulp. Sure hope my main characters don’t fit any of those molds. I mean, I like them all. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t be telling their stories … but I fear some of them may whine a little, or react instead of act, or have muddy motivation. So many sins. Is it even possible to avoid every single one?

— Way back in March, Kristin Lamb wrote a fantastic post on failure. (Let’s not talk about how I failed to read it until now, shall we?) My favorite line: “If we aren’t failing, then we aren’t doing anything interesting.” She also argues that failure makes us stronger. Since I have a huge fear of failure, I’m not sure I like that … but I can still see her point. She’s not the only one who feels that way, either. One of the things Bob Mayer said at his Desert Dreams workshop was something along the lines of “we need to do the thing we fear most” to succeed.

— Ready for a good laugh? Christina Dodd shared a link to this blog post on a terrible used cookbook from the ’70s called “Be Bold with Bananas.” Yes, the pictures are as terrible as you might imagine. I just hope it didn’t come from my mother’s cookbook shelf!